Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  November 21, 2014 9:00am-10:01am EST

9:00 am
this is bbc america, and now live from london, "bbc world news." >> hello, i'm david eades with "bbc world news." our top stories. president obama's message for five million illegal immigrants in the u.s., you can stay, if you pay your way. >> our neighbors, our classmates, our friends, they did not come here in search of a free ride of an easy life. prominent chinese journalist tried for leaking state secrets, but is it the state simply trying to curb freedom of expression? nearly three meters of snow
9:01 am
on the ground and more to come for people living in new york state, as america's big chill goes on. we'll find out what's to come next. another of our nominees for african football player of the year. we meet yaya toure. you heard it from the president. you can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. that was barack obama's message to millions of people living illegally in the united states as he announced the most sweeping reforms to america's immigration system for a generation. now, his directive will shield up to 5 million people from deportation. it will allow many to work legally, though there is no route to citizenship on offer
9:02 am
here. the executive orders allow mr. obama to bypass congress. under the plan, undocumented parents of children who are u.s. citizens or legal residents will be able to apply for work permits lasting some three years. now, there are thought to be around 11 million illegal immigrants in the united states in all. republicans are furious about this. they say the president is acting beyond his authority, and they're warning that relations have been poisoned. >> reporter: immigration. it's a topic that unites americans and divides them. >> for more than 200 years, our tradition of welcoming immigrants from around the world has given us a tremendous advantage over other nations. it's kept us youthful, dynamic, and entrepreneurial. it has shaped our character as a people with limitless possibilities. people not trapped by our past, but able to remake ourselves as we choose. but today, our immigration
9:03 am
system is broken. >> reporter: in the last year, thousands of illegal migrants have streamed across the country's southern border with mexico, piling pressure on the authorities. they're not the only ones adding to a case load of 11 million illegal immigrants at risk of deportation. using his executive powers, president obama says he's strengthening border controls, granting a longer stay to undocumented workers, promising visas and work permits to more of those who came here as children, and to the parents of those who live here legally. >> if you've been in america for more than five years, if you have children who are american citizens or legal residents, if you register, pass a criminal background check, and you're willing to pay your fair share of taxes, you'll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation. you can come out of the shadows. >> reporter: president obama
9:04 am
says around five million people will be shielded from the risk of deportation. but other illegal migrants say it doesn't guarantee them the path to citizenship that they had hoped for. republicans say president obama has overstepped his authority, and they believe the plan won't work. >> instead of working together to fix our broken immigration system, the president says he's acting on his own. that's just not how our democracy works. the president had said before that he's not king and he's not an emperor, but he's sure acting like one. >> reporter: other republicans who will control both congre congresses. but to his critics, president obama hit back. >> don't let a disagreement over a single issue be a deal breaker on every issue. that's not how our democracy works. and congress certainly shouldn't shut down our government again just because we disagree on
9:05 am
this. americans are tired of gridlock. >> reporter: the primetime message from the president was a passionate one. it is something he feels strongly about. his words, he hopes, will strike a note with americans and those who want to become american citizens. but by bypassing congress, he's only angered his critics, with some vowing the strongest political revenge possible, and even a push for impeachment. bbc news, washington. tens of thousands of people have marched in mexico city, calling on the government to find the 43 students who went missing in mexico's southern guerrero state some two months ago now. the protest saw some clashes, though largely it was peaceful. the march was led by the students' relatives, who have been touring the country to raise awareness of their plight. >> reporter: this is a small town near the pacific coast.
9:06 am
all political parties are responsible, all state officials are accomplices, this woman says. this is what sparked it all. 43 students who went missing in late september. they were last seen bundled into a van by the police. this political crisis has revealed the widespread anger against the political system. mexicans seem to be fed up that there are tens of thousands of people missing since 2006 when this drug war started, and no one seems to be doing anything about it. there is still a lot of fear in this part of mexico. many don't want to show their identity when they participate in these protests. the official line is that the students are likely to have been killed after a corrupt mayor who's now in jail in collusion with the police handed them over to drug cartel hitmen because he was fed up with their constant protests for a better life. but the parents, although
9:07 am
desperate, still think they are alive. all of the parents are desperate, we ask each other how will they be, where are they, are they eating, are they tied up, do they even get water? and now for francisco, it's back to the road again. they've been traveling for a week now, stopping at towns. there are three towns like this one in north, east, and here in the southwest of mexico. daniela's brother is one of the missing, and being on the caravan gives her some comfort. she tells me that if she stays at home, she feels sad. but here, she gets the support of the people in the caravan. a uk-funded mexican project has been trying to make sense of why there are so many disappeared here, and also trying to find
9:08 am
them. >> i think it's also linked with a lack of political interest the country has had until now. seeing lies like never before. we know because of the police in guerrero that they have found something close to 100 clandestine mass graves. so guerrero is like a red spot of mass graves. >> reporter: mexico has become a country of mass graves in the last decade. many were found in the search for the 43 missing students. such is the scale of this problem that nobody really knows how many people have disappeared in this country. and most likely, no one will ever know. parts of the northeast of the united states are still paralyzed by what's being called in some quarters as a historic level of snowfall. the city of buffalo shines out
9:09 am
above them all at the moment. it's thought to have received as much snow in three days as it would expect in a year. rain has been forecast now for the weekend. that could bring further misery. as alpa patel reports. >> reporter: the battle in buffalo is on. this woman is standing on her car, which is completely buried. >> see, there's its door. >> nice. >> you wouldn't believe how long it took to find it. >> reporter: the extreme weather is continuing to disrupt everyday life. and here's why -- the region has received as much snow in three days as it would do in an entire year. overnight, more snow fell with some parts expecting at least two feet. it's not good news for the emergency services, who have been working around the clock. members of the national guard have been brought in to help.
9:10 am
to show his thanks, gunfire of new york handed out pizzas. >> this is i believe the largest deployment of its kind ever. literally thousands of people from across the state coming in to help. >> reporter: but anxiety is growing, particularly over the amount of snow on rooftops. this is the fear, that the sheer weight will cause collapse, with concern for those living in trailers. firefighters had to assist more than a hundred elderly residents from their nursing home in new york after cracking started to appear inside their building. the east coast has been particularly badly affected, but the entire country is in the grip of a rare cold snap with the authorities struggling to keep up with the elements. but with temperatures set to rise at the weekend, attention is turning to a new fear, the thawing of so much snow could
9:11 am
lead to widespread flooding. alpa patel, bbc news. >> always something else to worry about. with me is helen, we're talking about historic amounts of snow. how come? >> it's very early in the season, this cold arctic air that's arrived. so it's nothing unusually normally. it's just so early in the season. so we have all this cold, dry, canadian arctic air that slipped southwards across the great lakes, and it's very site specific to that part of the world, because you've got the cold dry air sucking up all the moisture, the huge masses, the huge bodies of water, which actually are quite warm at this time of the year. temperatures seven or eight degrees above freezing. so you get convection. and as soon as they hit the land, those clouds just fall. the snow just falls very steadily for quite a significant amount of time because you've still got the feed of winds across these warm bodies of water. 20 miles inland it will have
9:12 am
stopped snowing. we're seeing interesting contrasts. some areas seeing feet of snow. others seeing centimeters. >> that is bizarre. let's look at the clear-up. what's the forecast looking at? >> it may well get worse before it gets better. the snow might ease, but the temperatures are expected to jump up into the teens, so from minus three or four for the last couple of days to perhaps as high as 16 or 17 by monday, so there's going to be a rapid thaw. i'll show you the weather system and why that's gradually going to happen. the warm air starts to come up through tonight, so gradual thaw, but with some rain then arriving on top of that, we could well see freezing rain for saturday is an issue, and then thaw continues, and then heavy rain towards the end of the weekend, obviously adding to the water that we've already got stored within that snow. >> on a more selfish note, sit heading our way? >> everything moves from east to west, so eventually that air will arrive across the europe
9:13 am
air. however, it will be very different. it's got vast areas of warm atlantic ocean to take in. it's already been changed over the great lakes as it is, so it will arrive in a very different format. if we get cold weather, which it might well be over the weekend frosty, that's because we get either a northerly wind from the arctic or a siberian wind coming over the north sea and bringing some snow that way. >> not three meters of it hopefully. helen, thank you very much. >> pleasure. now, one of china's most outspoken journalists has gone on trial in beijing accused of leaking state secrets. gao you is accused of passing on a communist party document that warns its members against western values. her trial lasted four hours in all. she's 70 years old. she faces life in prison if convicted. the bbc's john sudworth in shanghai has details of what she's on trial for. >> reporter: 17-year-old gao you, a respected and outspoken journalist, is accused of
9:14 am
leaking an internal communist party document to the foreign media. document number nine, as it's known, was circulated to party members warning them of the dangers of western freedoms and values last year. during the case, which lasted just four hours in a closed door session, her lawyer says that ms. gao proclaimed her innocence and told the court that her confession was made under duress. campaigners are calling for her release. amnesty international says that the state's secret charge is trumped up, and human rights watch says the charge makes no sense anyway as the document that she is alleged to have released was in wide public circulation anyway. in another sign of the sensitivities over this case, her lawyer says that as soon as proceedings were over, he was ordered into a police car and driven to the outskirts of beijing to prevent him from talking to the media
9:15 am
face-to-face. no verdict was delivered today, but when it comes, and many people expect that a guilty verdict is a foregone conclusion, ms. gao can expect to serve up to a life sentence in prison. >> that's john sudworth there. thanks for being with us here on "bbc world news." stay with us, if you can, because coming up in a moment, who's next to go viral? how youtube hopes to foster the internet video stars of tomorrow.
9:16 am
♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ to build something smarter. ♪ some come here to build something stronger.
9:17 am
others come to build something faster... something safer... something greener. something the whole world can share. people come to boeing to do many different things. but it's always about the very thing we do best. ♪ thanks for being with us here on "bbc world news." i'm david eades. the latest headlines. president obama has outlined some of the most sweeping changes to the u.s. immigration system for decades. around five million people living illegally in america could benefit. a prominent chinese journalist gao you has stood trial, accused of leaking state secrets. but rights groups say the state
9:18 am
is trying to curb freedom of expression. time to pick up on the business. that means aaron. >> hello, david. talking japan at the moment. good to see you. japan's prime minister shinzo abe has dissolved the lower house of the country's parliament, paving the way for snap elections next month. the lower house speaker has announced the disillusion and legislators, when he did that, they shouted bonsai, a traditional cheer of celebration in japan. mr. abe said he was seeking a freshmandate for his economic policies, following news that japan slipped into recession. m policies, following news that japan slipped into recession. so we're going to keep across those elections next month. the european toy market is in santa's bad books this christmas. why? it seems that toys are the most recalled consumer good in europe, actually, with kid's clothing not that far behind. their safety records lag behind
9:19 am
other industries largely because of the impact from recent new eu legislation. we're going to talk more about that as well coming up on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. now, we've all heard of the phrase going viral. the power of sites like youtube to turn someone from zero to internet hero overnight. and, of course, raking huge sums of advertising bucks for the owner in the process of doing it. now youtube is investing millions of dollars to help foster tomorrow's stars of the internet video by setting up professional studios from london to tokyo to los angeles. they are free to use for anyone who has at least 5,000 subscrib subscribers. samira hussain has been inside one of the latest ones. she's in new york. we'll have that report throughout the rest of the day. there she is right there. follow me on twitter. you get me @bbcaaron. scary idea. could take away our business, buddy. watch it. watch it. >> no.
9:20 am
it's not a linear world. isn't that what they say? something like that. aaron, thanks very much. the father of michael brown, the black teenager shot dead three months ago, has issued a video message. he's calling for restraint. this is at a time of heightened tension. a decision is expected imminently on whether to charge the officer involved. here is a report from ferguson in missouri. >> reporter: ferguson is prepared for another outpouring of emotion. the grand jury is due to announce whether to indict the police officer who shot dead an unarmed black teenager here in august. >> hello. my name is michael brown sr. my family and i are hurting. our whole region is hurting. >> reporter: in a new video, the boy's father has called for a nonviolent response. >> but hurting others or destroying property is not the answer. no matter what the grand jury decides, i do not want my son's
9:21 am
death to be in vain. i want it to lead to incredible change. positive change. >> reporter: in the aftermath of michael brown's killing, ferguson's streets returned to a conflict zone. in isolated incidents, demonstrators looted, but many saw the police tactics as being totally out of proportion and punishing peaceful protesters. the experience has seen a new generation of black activists and organizers emerge here. while they condemn violence, they did promise civil disobedience and the shutting of government institutions if the police officer is not indicted. >> we punched the system in the mouth that has been put in place to oppress a certain class of people for well over 300 years, and this is the first time that it's been damaged since the '60s. they're afraid. this is the longest active protest since the montgomery
9:22 am
busboy cot. they're afraid and they should be. >> we'll have medical personnel if some people have a medical issue. >> reporter: there is certainly anxiety about what the coming days will brism some churches have made plans to take in those seeking shelter, including demonstrators, if there are clashes again. >> we've got lots of battles of water. gatorade. >> reporter: this is no longer about michael brown or just one case. for so many, this has already become the key battleground in what they see as a continued struggle for equality for african-americans across this country. bbc news ferguson, missouri. now to events here in the uk, as the anti-european union party, the uk independence party, has just won its second seat in parliament. mark reckless, who defected from the conservative party, won the rochester by election, that's in kent in southeast england. this is what he had to say.
9:23 am
>> the radical tradition, which has stood and spoken for the working class, has found a new home in uk. as labour represents those responsible at the top of the public sector, it is not ed miliband, but ukip that represents the concerns of most working men and women. >> mark reckless there, who is now the second ukip mp. all this week, we've been profiling five nominees. yaya toure won the award last year and he's had a pretty good time of 2014 as well, winning the english premier league title and the league cup with manchester city. he's been speak about his nomination this time around to our reporter john bennett. >> it's fantastic.
9:24 am
this trophy, specially for the african player who's doing very well in his respective league. a couple are doing very well. there's been a lot of football last year and this year. between that, we had the world cup. i think liverpool was in great form. beating all the teams. they beat us in anfield. i think last year was a fantastic league, you know i mean? and at that point, to win the league. it was unbelievable because every player, even the fans as well enjoyed. i've been working a lot, because i would wake up earlier in the morning, training every morning just to be in the top of the top. i've been working a lot, a lot,
9:25 am
a lot. i think what is happening, i'm very happy and very satisfied about it because all the work i've been doing when i was young is not for nothing. my family, they've been so happy. after that, it would be quite difficult, you know. after that, i had a couple of injuries. for me, i said, i want to give back. give you, you know, something else, and you know what i mean. it means a lot when the fans
9:26 am
give you something like they love you and they appreciate what you are doing. >> could he make it two in a row? that's yaya toure. still time to vote for your bbc african footballer of the year. just go to www.bbc.com/africanfootball. thanks for watching "bbc world news."
9:27 am
teacher of the un-teachable. you lower handicaps... and raise hopes.
9:28 am
and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (pro) nice drive. (vo) well played, business pro. well played. go national. go like a pro. (receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. ♪ limits are there to be shattered. ♪
9:29 am
barriers are meant to be broken. ♪ lines are drawn to be crossed. ♪ introducing the first ever 467 horsepower rcf coupe from lexus. once driven, there's no going back. ♪
9:30 am
our top stories. president obama's message for five million illegal immigrants in the united states, you can stay if you pay your way. >> our neighbors, our classmates, our friends, they did not come here in search of a free ride or an easy life. prominent chinese journalist gao you tried for leaking state secrets, but is the state simply trying to curb freedom of expression?
9:31 am
riot police in mexico city push back thousands of anti-corruption demonstrators from the capital's main square. also, we have an interview with the president of the philippines. amid tensions in the south china sea, he reveals what was said during a meeting with the chinese president. the words of the president, you can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. that was barack obama's message to millions of people living illegally in the united states. as he announced the most sweeping reforms to america's immigration system for a generation. his directive will shield up to five million people from deportation. it will allow many of them to work legally, though it doesn't offer a route to citizenship. the changes were forced through
9:32 am
using executive orders that allow president obama to bypass congress. under the plan, undocumented parents of children who are u.s. citizens or legal residents will be able to apply for work permits lasting three years. there are thought to be around 11 million illegal immigrants in the united states in total. republicans, though, are furious. they say the president is acting beyond his authority and are warning that relations have been poisoned. >> reporter: immigration. it's a topic that unites americans and divides them. >> for more than 200 years, our tradition of welcoming immigrants from around the world has given us a tremendous advantage over other nations. it's kept us youthful, dynamic, and entrepreneurial. it has shaped our character as a people with limitless possibilities. people not trapped by our past, but able to remake ourselves as we choose. but today, our immigration system is broken.
9:33 am
>> reporter: in the last year, thousands of illegal migrants have streamed across the country's southern border with mexico, piling pressure on the authorities. they're not the only ones adding to a case load of 11 million illegal immigrants at risk of deportation. using his executive powers, president obama says he's strengthening border controls, granting a longer stay to undocumented workers, promising visas and work permits to more of those who came here as children, and to the parents of those who live here legally. >> if you've been in america for more than five years, if you have children who are american citizens or legal residents, if you register, pass a criminal background check, and you're willing to pay your fair share of taxes, you'll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation. you can come out of the shadows. >> reporter: president obama says around 5 million people will be shielded from the risk of deportation. but other illegal migrants here
9:34 am
in the united states say it doesn't go far enough, it doesn't guarantee them the path to citizenship that they had hoped for. republicans say president obama has overstepped his authority, and they believe the plan won't work. >> instead of working together fix our broken immigration system, the president says he's acting on his own. that's just now how our democracy works. the president had said before that he's not king and he's not an emperor. but he's sure acting like one. >> reporter: other republicans who will control both houses in congress come january argue that the plan will only encourage more migrants to come illegally. but to his critics, president obama hit back. >> don't let a disagreement over a single issue be a deal breaker on every issue. that's not how our democracy works, and congress certainly shouldn't shut down our government again just because we disagree on this. americans are tired of gridlock.
9:35 am
>> reporter: the primetime message from the president was a passionate one. it is something he feels strongly about. his words, he hopes will strike a note with americans and those who want to become american citizens. but by bypassing congress, he's only angered his critics, with some vowing the strongest political revenge possible, and even a push for impeachment. bbc news, washington. >> we're beginning to have a further look at that story in a moment or two. you'll be hearing from democrats and republicans abroad talking more about mr. obama's immigration overhaul. we'll stay in the states for a moment, though, because parts of the northeast of the country in particular are still paralyzed by what's being deskrd described by some as historic levels of snowfall. buffalo has received as much snow three days as it would expect in a year. the snow is expected to subside,
9:36 am
but more misery ahead with rain being forecast for the weekend, and the authorities in new york state are worrying about buildings which could collapse when that rain arrives because it will add to the weight of snow lying on the roofs. one of china's most respected and outspoken journalists has gone on trial in beijing. accused of leaking state secrets. gao you is accused of passing on a communist party document that warns its members against western values. her trial lasted just four hours. the 70-year-old defendant is facing life in prison if convicted. john sudworth is following the story from shanghai. >> reporter: this is a document known as document number nine. it's believed to be the one that gao you is accused of handing to a u.s.-based media organization, and essentially it was an internal communist party document warning members, circulated very widely within the party, but warning members against the dangers of western
9:37 am
values and freedoms, things like our constitutionalism, things like freedom of speech, free media, those sorts of things. it was seen to represent another tightening, if you like, of the policy towards, you know, political reform, those sorts of issues under china's new leader xi jinping, who came to power a couple of years ago, and since he came to power, we've seen this tightening. numbers of dissidents, academics, lawyers, journalists swept up, accused of crimes against the state. and critics say that gao you has fallen foul of the same thing, that basically she was involved in nothing more really than what anywhere else would be considered journalism. the development of sources, the discussion of internal party wranglings. pretty critical of the chinese leadership, but nothing worse than that. and yet for having published this document, or at least
9:38 am
passed it on for publication, she is accused of leaking state secrets, a charge which carries a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. her trial today lasted just four hours, but we'll have to wait a few more days, her lawyer says, before we know the verdict. >> john sudworth there. some troubling scenes in mexico. tens of thousands of people from across the country have marched on the center of the capital demanding the government do more to find out what's happened to the 43 students who went missing two months ago. the protest has been led by relatives of those students. they were taken in the southern state of guerrero by police believed by many to be linked to drugs gangs. mexico's attorney general says there's strong evidence that all of them are dead. >> reporter: the number 43 has taken on a special significance in mexico. although 27,000 people have disappeared or been abducted in the last decade, it is the case of the 43 students from the
9:39 am
state of guerrero that drew thousands of people on to the streets of the capital from every walk of life. as darkness fell, tens of thousands converged on mexico city's historic center. every few minutes or so, they counted from one to 43. this was a huge show of defiance in the face of a government that has been accused of showing almost no concern for the missing students. when the 43 students were abducted, the president insisted it was a local problem. he didn't etven go down to guerrero. it's now turned into a national crisis. the families of the disappeared and their supporters, thousands of them now laying siege to his palace here in the capital mexico city. in what was an overwhelmingly peaceful protest, emotions boiled over, as a small group of demonstrators tried to storm the
9:40 am
palace. but the police response was by mexican standards constrained. mexico right now is like a tinderbox. for the last two months, the faces of the disappeared students have stared out at an embarrassed nation. their friends and families looking for simple answers have toured the country, forcing the gvt -- government to take notice. speaking out for his missing friends, omar garcia survived the police ambush on the students' buses and the subsequent abduction. i began to question my own sanity, he tells me. how can this happen? 43 people can't just go missing in a country that calls itself developed. taken aback by the scale of the protest, the government has belatedly promised to fully investigate the abductions.
9:41 am
but its inaction thus far has left it badly damaged. now to ukraine, as pro-western lawmakers have announced a parliamentary coalition. this comes on the first anniversary of kiev's revolution, that's being marked in maidan square. joe biden has been meeting ukraine's leaders today. among them, the prime minister there on the right. they're expected to discuss the collapse of a cease-fire in the east of the country. according to the u.n., nearly a thousand people have been killed since that cease-fire was declared in early september. the south china seas have become one of the most disputed ocean territories in the world, with the islands known as the spratlys fast becoming a flash point.
9:42 am
it's thought there could be huge reserves of hydrocarbons beneath what is already a busy shipping lane. it's rare that the leaders of either country open themselves up to questioning, but my colleague secured an interview with the philippines' president, and he began by asking about a meeting with his chinese counterpart in beijing last week. >> we had a few minutes conversation, but the message was really inspiring in a sense. first, there was the long-standing relationships between china and the philippines. and the emphasis of very good relations existing for generations. second, the appeal to find constructive solutions to the disputes that we have, and the hope that we go in the same direction. so the significance to us is there have been no high-level dialogues between their side and our side for quite some time. so this is an opening. and hopefully it will bear fruit. >> reporter: it is an opening because both countries still
9:43 am
have issues regarding the territorial disputes in the south china sea. and the philippines has elevated this case to the united nations tribunal. with this more harmonious relationship between the two countries, are you planning to withdraw? >> no, no. we want to resolve the issue. even china stated that they were also in favor of coming up with a code of conduct at the most appropriate time. >> so you think, mr. president, the territorial dispute in the south china sea with china will be solved before the end of your term? >> we are hoping that either through the coc or the arbitration process that will be resolved. at the end of the day -- and i'd really like to emphasize this. it is not against anybody, but rather should be seen as for everybody. what does that mean? there is a dispute of what the rights and obligations are with
9:44 am
regards to each other. so the proceedings will state clerly what the duties and obligations of each other, which will promote stability.arly wha obligations of each other, which will promote stability. >>. as west african countries continue fighting the ebola virus, the infrastructure of poorer countries is coming under increasing pressure. in areas where mall nourishment is common, they find it that much harder to fight the disease.nourishment is common, they find it that much harder to fight the disease. our health correspondent is in guinea. she spoke to the world food program. >> reporter: we're at the world food program's warehouse. they are delivering between 3,000 and 4,000 tons of food to ebola-hit areas every month. and joining me is world food program's country director elizabeth fore. just tell me how bad the
9:45 am
situation is here in guinea. >> well, the areas that have been the hardest hit by the ebola virus were areas that were highly food insecure, even before we had ebola in guinea. and we have indications that the situation, the food security situation has actually got worse. >> and why is that? >> well, because people are not -- farmers aren't going to the fields. traders are not -- food trader markets are affected, so markets are not functioning. there isn't the movement, the local economy has been heavily affected. and then also there's a lot of stigmatization. sometimes people don't want to sell the food. >> what are they doing instead in. >> well, they're coping. the coping strategies are quite intense. so people are reducing the number of meals that they're eating every day.
9:46 am
they're reducing the quality of the food that they're eating. quite drastic measures. >> reporter: and you're supplying food to some of the treatment centers as well. that's clearly very important. >> yes, that's a key part of the world food program's response in guinea. providing hot meals to the patients three times a day. what we have been told by our medical partners that we work closely with, msf who run these treatment centers, is that, you know, there's a period of time right at the beginning when someone is confirmed with ebola, when today don't have that many symptoms, and if we feed them well at that point and they're well-nourished, they're stronger, better able to deal with the heavy symptoms that come later. and have a better chance of surviving and recovering afterwards. so providing nutritious food to those patients is critical. >> elizabeth fore, director for the wfp, thank you very much. they're doing food drops every
9:47 am
single day here, and they said that this is crucial to helping bring this outbreak under control because it gives people much better chance of fighting the virus off if they're well-nourished, they're able to much-better be able to fight ebola and survive. do stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come in the program, egypt's first women's roller derby team. we skate out with the k rollers and see how their lives have been changed. express deals and saved a ton. i got everything i wanted. i always do. he seemed nice. to build something smarter. ♪ some come here to build something stronger.
9:48 am
others come to build something faster... something safer... something greener. something the whole world can share. people come to boeing to do many different things. but it's always about the very thing we do best. ♪
9:49 am
you're watching "bbc world news" with me, david eades. our main news. president obama has outlined some of the most sweeping changes to the u.s. immigration system for decades. around five million people living illegally in america could benefit. we'll get some more on that now, because to help explain the
9:50 am
issues, i've been speaking to the spokesperson for republicans overseas here in london. that's stacy hilliard. and also chair of democrats abroad uk rob carolina. i asked rob why he thought republicans were so upset by mr. obama's use of the executive order. >> when you go to school in america, you learn in year seven or eight about the u.s. constitution, about separation of powers, about the independence of the executive branch and executive authority that rests with the president of the united states. what the president has done, what he has announced is within the scope of his authority as chief of the executive branch. >> so you're happy enough with the situation. stacy, how do you see it? >> well, i see it quite differently from rob. over 20 times as president, actually said this is not within my authority to have sweeping immigration reform through an executive order. but yet when he loses the midterm election and sees he's going to be up against a republican house, to me it seems like sour grapes and it's a sore loser and it's the arrogance that this president has said
9:51 am
that says i know what's better for the american people than the american people do. >> his argument would be, we've been waiting for the house of representatives for a years or so to come up with something. it's not doing its job, so i've got to get on with it. >> i appreciate his argument, but my response to that would be if you really want to see compromise and you're really willing to work with this republican congress and senate, then do it. why do it two months before they come into the office, before these republican senators and congressmen are sworn in? why are you doing it now? i think that this president has been very subjective when he wants to use executive order, and when he's actually going to use congress, and he's showing he wants to bypass congress when it's something he believes is best for the country. but when it's something that other people within the united states feel it should be done, such as action in syria, he's more than happy to say oh no-no, this is not in my congressional authority. >> one of the issues with this is it is not conclusive. it's got about a three-year timeframe on it for these people.
9:52 am
so would it simply not have been better to hang on, grind it out and find some sort of common ground with congress? >> well, there's always an inherent risk with the use of executive authority, that it hinges upon who happens to be the executive from time to time. but coming back to a point that stacy made in terms of what the american people want, there's been a poll recently from nbc and "wall street journal" saying that 74% of the american people want a solution like this. which is to say looking at a situation where we have so many people who are undocumented, who can be and are being productive members of society, who are nonetheless stuck in the dark economy, unable to pay taxes even if they want to. >> something that works for everyone, i presume that is the thinking, is it? >> nobody's arguing that we don't need immigration reform. that's very clear. i'm from texas, from a border state that has to take this on day in and day out and we see the ramifications of human trafficking that happens when these executive orders are placed. every time this has been done throughout history, there's been an increase in illegal
9:53 am
immigrants. there's been an increase in human trafficking, in child trafficking coming across the border. this is something that is irresponsible of the president, instead of working with congress saying we're going to put three years on this and see what happens. we don't know what's going to happen after that. it would be much smartder for him to work with the congress to come up with a real solution. you may not have heard of roller derby. some have described it as rugby on wheels. two teams race around a track trying to block each other's players physically and things get pretty rough. egypt has its first ever all-female roller derby team, the cairollers. we went to meet some of them. >> i have been with cairollers for almost one year.
9:54 am
i didn't know anything about skating before i joined cairollers, so it was so hard to do something like this when you are 24. five players on each team on the track. you have four from each team named as a blocker. and one from each team as a jammer. when the jammer from your team passes a player from the opposite team, she scores a point. the cairollers don't have a sponsor, so we must raise the money to support the team. it gives me the idea that i could start my own business. some people make accessories.
9:55 am
others doing something like cupcakes and muffins. bags and t-shirts. yeah, when i did this one, support local derby, i got orders, like oh, i need this one! i love this one. and this one also. block like an egyptian. i love this one, too. it's so hard to actually work in cairo. the streets became more and more crowded. playing roller derby makes you more stronger. like no, i'm strong now, i can do this. we are now beginning our third season in cairo.
9:56 am
i'm coming! proud to be the first people who played this in egypt. it makes a girl show confidence with herself. >> not quite sport for all, but there's something for everyone, i guess. now, a woman in the u.s. state of missouri has had a very lucky escape. have a look at this. a car chase in kansas city ended in pretty spectacular fashion there. whoa. gosh. the woman being pursued by police crashed her suv into a building, causing it to collapse on to the car. that's a fair amount of wreckage, isn't it? she was taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries. police say they did try to stop her vehicle, but she just took off. also, have a look at this. depending on your point of view,
9:57 am
what's going on in these pictures is either an appalling waste of wine, or a dream come true. you're looking at a win bath in a hot spring just west of tokyo. it's filled up like this every year to mark, you guessed it, the international release. as i say, each to their own. thanks for watching "bbc world news."
9:58 am
9:59 am
10:00 am
hello, and welcome to "gmt" on "bbc world news." i'm stephen sackur. our top stories. president obama tells millions of illegal immigrants, you can come out of the shadows, as he uses his executive power to push through immigration reform. up to five million immigrants are freed from the threat of deportation, but the republican-controlled congress announces it as an abuse of presidential power. >> our neighbors, our classmates, our friends, they di

22 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on